Seminar Descriptions (Fall 2014)

Information about credit to the major is included when available; in other cases, consult the department. This site contains information received by June 9, 2014. Instructors reserve the right to alter the information provided. Course meeting times and locations will be listed on the Yale Online Course Information (OCI) system.

Berkeley

CSBK 310, HU, Heroes and Villains in Film and Literature. Eddy Friedfeld, attorney, consultant, and entertainment journalist and historian. Lecturer in Yale College.

American archetypes of heroes and villains explored through the genesis and evolution of the detective, gangster, and spy genres in film and novels. Ways in which great directors, actors, and writers influenced these archetypes and were influenced by them.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Branford

CSBR 310, SO, Business and Sustainability. Cary Krosinsky, Executive Director, Network for Sustainable Financial Markets, adjunct instructor, The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. Lecturer in Yale College.

Trends in environmental, social, and corporate-governance factors that affect the potential success of global business and investing. The history and ongoing evolution of socially responsible investing, including divestment movements and positive investment options; contemporary positive methodologies such as impact investing. Developing corporate solutions to increasing challenges; building investment scenarios.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Calhoun

CSCC 310, HU, Architecture and Society in the British Empire. Robert Grant Irving, cultural historian. Lecturer in Yale College.

Human and natural forces that molded buildings and society in Britain’s overseas empire from the seventeenth to twentieth centuries. Architecture and cities as expressions of imperial ideas and events in examples from India, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the British Caribbean, Bahamas, Bermuda, and Britain’;s North American territories.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Davenport

CSDC 310, SO, The Press, Business, and the Economy. Thomas Herman, journalist and teacher. Lecturer in Yale College.

A study of the ways that journalists define and shape economic news. Discussion of the pressures that business journalists face and the process of press coverage for business, economics, financial markets, and personal finance.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Timothy Dwight

CSTD 310, SO, The Doctor-Patient Relationship. Julian Polaris, J.D. candidate, Yale Law School. PTAI.

Physician and patient perspectives on the doctor-patient relationship in the American health care system. Relevant laws; the challenges of interactions such as medical malpractice, assisted suicide, and financial conflicts of interest; the extent to which current policy mirrors patients’ intuition about what is right or wrong.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Jonathan Edwards

CSJE 310, SO, Child, Family, and State. William Garfinkel, federal judge. Lecturer in Yale College.

Exploration of the allocation and exercise of authority over children in American society. Examination of areas in which children and parents encounter the legal system. Topics include children’s rights, child abuse and neglect, the legal treatment of fetuses, child custody, medical treatment and experimentation, juvenile justice, and public education.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Morse

CSMC 310, Neuroanatomy through Neurosurgical Cases. David Gimbel, Neurosurgery Resident, Yale–New Haven Hospital. Lecturer in Yale College.

The structure and function of the human central nervous system and the problems that can result from its dysfunction. Study of specific aspects of neuroanatomy paired with analysis of relevant clinical cases. Medical problem solving and decision making; potential benefits and risks of surgical intervention. Prerequisite: Advanced Placement or college-level biology.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Pierson

CSPC 310, HU, Classical Storytelling and Modern Screenwriting. Brian Price, screenwriter, adjunct professor, UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television. Lecturer in Yale College.

Fundamentals of screenwriting and the current dominant mode of the craft. Theories of story, structure, and character, including Aristotle’s analysis of classical drama; screenwriting as both a craft and an art; film’s role in the history of storytelling. Students develop an original story idea and write the first act of a feature-length screenplay. Writing sample required. Enrollment limited to 15.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Saybrook

CSSY 310, SO, Leadership and Politics. Madhuri Kommareddi, Director of Program Development in the Office of Hillary Rodham Clinton, Clinton Foundation; John Paul Rollert, author, adjunct faculty, University of Chicago and Harvard Extension School. Lecturers in Yale College.

Qualities that form a foundation for successful leadership in politics and beyond. The psychology of leadership and the traits that produce strong, compelling leaders. Case study of the 2008 presidential campaign and the first term of President Obama, including challenges presented by the recession, the Affordable Care Act, and the rise of the Tea Party.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Silliman

CSSM 310, SO, Hip Hop Music and Culture. Nicholas Conway, adjunct professor, DJ, and private tutor. Lecturer in Yale College. Approved for credit to the major in American Studies.

The evolution of hip hop music and culture from the 1970s through the 1990s, including graffiti art, b-boying (break dancing), DJ-ing, and MC-ing. Examination of the historical and political contexts in which hip hop culture has taken shape. Attention to questions of race, gender, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and old-fashioned “funkiness.” Includes three evening screenings.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Ezra Stiles

CSES 310, SO, Climate Change in the Media. Paul Lussier, executive producer and writer, President of Me2U Media. Lecturer in Yale College.

The history of media representations of climate-change science. Reasons for the lack of public awareness on the issue, including the role of naysayers and corporate media, ineffective scientific messaging, and current media’s emphasis on headlines and on protagonists and antagonists. Traditional and new-media strategies to promote understanding and action.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Trumbull

CSTC 310, The Screenwriter’s Craft. Camille Thomasson, screenwriter. Lecturer in Yale College.

Screenwriting workshop combined with film screenings and critical examination of modern screenplays. Guidelines for structuring a screenplay, techniques for developing original characters, and questions to ask when building a cinematic narrative. Students develop scenarios and characters for original scripts. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
Check application status for this seminar

Yale College

CSYC 310, Great Big Ideas. Adam Glick, President of the Jack Parker Corporation and of the Floating University. Lecturer in Yale College.

An introduction to the world’s most important ideas in a wide variety of disciplines, including psychology, economics, art, biomedical research, linguistics, physics, politics, and demography. Ways in which innovative ideas have changed each field; the effects of those ideas on modern society. Preference to freshmen and sophomores.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).

Application to this seminar is not done through Preference Selection. Interested students should attend the first session of the seminar in the Timothy Dwight College dining hall, at which application procedures will be discussed.

Back to top