Seminar Descriptions (Spring 2015)

Information about credit to the major is included when available; in other cases, consult the department. This site contains information received by November 20, 2014. Instructors reserve the right to alter the information provided. Course meeting times and locations are listed on the Yale Online Course Information (OCI) system.

Berkeley

CSBK 320, SO, Approaches to Sustainable Food and Agriculture. Mark Bomford, Director, Yale Sustainable Food Project. Lecturer in Yale College.

Introduction to the global food system through critical analysis of four ideological and technical approaches to meeting the world’s food needs: organic farming, relocalization, vertical farming, and food sovereignty. Ways in which context, values, and networks shape the food system. Use of quantitative, social science, and humanities methodologies. Includes visits to Yale Farm sites.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Branford

CSBR 320, Negotiation and Behavior Change. Justin Wright, conflict-management consultant, mediator, and negotiation trainer. Lecturer in Yale College.

A study of negotiation theories with interactive negotiation simulations. Analysis and implementation of strategies for creating mutual gains and behavior change. Development and application of theories of negotiation and conflict resolution.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Calhoun

CSCC 320, HU, The Space Industry in U.S. History. Alden Richards, aerospace consultant, lecturer at Brown University. Lecturer in Yale College.

The history and development of the space industry in the United States. Principles of rocketry, orbits, and celestial navigation; ways in which outer space has reflected and informed the cultural imagination; effects of finance, law, and geopolitical relations on the exploration and commercial exploitation of the space environment.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Davenport

CSDC 320, The Role of Real Estate in Economy and Society. Richard Powers, private investor. Lecturer in Yale College.

The role of real estate in building the modern economy. The increasing importance of property, from ancient civilizations to the development of western legal structures and into the modern era. Property’s connection to individual liberty and social norms; eminent domain; the government’s role in supporting housing; development and investment case studies.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Timothy Dwight

CSTD 320, SO, Gay Rights, Abortion Rights, and Religious Freedom. Joyce Chen, attorney. Lecturer in Yale College.

Constitutional law that protects gay rights, abortion rights, and religious freedom. Controversies in which individual and religious-liberty rights have clashed recently in the courts and in legislatures. Topics include religious exemptions, same-sex marriage, public accommodations, conscientious objections, and free speech.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Jonathan Edwards

CSJE 320, The Craft of Narrative Journalism. Jake Halpern, author and journalist. Lecturer in Yale College.

The craft of feature-length journalistic writing. The process from beginning to end, including composing a pitch, researching a reported piece, fact checking, organizing information, and rewriting. Attention to capturing dialogue and portraying a subject, as well as to journalistic ethics. Enrollment limited to 15. Requires a writing sample of no more than five pages e-mailed to college.seminar@yale.edu at the time of application.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Morse

CSMC 320, Trials of the Century. Jack Ford, television journalist. Lecturer in Yale College. Approved for credit to the major in American Studies.

An examination of several famous trials of the twentieth century. The legal significance, political and historical context, social implications, and media coverage of each case. Trials include the Lindbergh kidnapping case; the Scopes “monkey trial”; the Rosenberg spy case; the Chicago Seven conspiracy case; the O. J. Simpson, Emmett Till, and Charles Manson murder trials; and the impeachment trial of President Clinton.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Pierson

CSPC 320, HU, Social History of Gossip. Carolee Klimchock, doctoral candidate in American Studies. PTAI.

The substance and style of gossip from the ancient world to the present, with a focus on history and performance. Ways in which gossip informs understandings of interpersonal exchange and its effects on public and private intimacies.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Saybrook

CSSY 320, HU, The Book of Job and Contemporary Evil. James Ponet, Howard M. Holtzmann Jewish Chaplain at Yale, Director of Joseph Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale. Lecturer in Yale College.

The psychological, existential, political, and religious questions raised by examining the book of Job as a timeless literary classic. Ways in which the text sheds light on human suffering and violation and on human hunger for power, love, justice, forgiveness, and redemption. Special attention to issues surrounding slavery, genocide, and ethnic cleansing.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Silliman

CSSM 320, Digital Media Activism. Jason Q. Ng, research fellow, University of Toronto. Lecturer in Yale College.

The use of digital media to promote political and social causes around the world. Effects of the Internet on activism and organizing; digital technologies as a medium and as a source of contention for specific events and regions. Introduction to relevant computer skills, with attention to digital hygiene, encryption, anticensorship tools, and Web scraping. No previous programming experience required.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Ezra Stiles

CSES 320, SO, Child Care, Society, and Public Policy. Jessica Sager, attorney, and Janna Wagner, educator, Cofounders and Directors of All Our Kin, an early education advocacy and training organization. Lecturers in Yale College.

Exploration of the decisions society makes about where young children belong and how to regulate, pay for, and support their development. The effects of these decisions on the well-being of children, families, and the economy.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Trumbull

CSTC 320, SO, Prison Conditions in Modern America. Dara Young, Program Manager, Wesleyan Center for Prison Education. Lecturer in Yale College.

Critical examination of living conditions, health care, violence, and corrections in U.S. prisons. Social forces that shape prisons and prisoners and maintain the current penal system. Ways in which the experience of prison life is translated and presented to the outside world.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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Yale College

CSYC 320, SO, Economic Sanctions in U.S. Foreign Policy. Luke Bronin, General Counsel in the Office of the Governor of Connecticut. Lecturer in Yale College.

The evolution and efficacy of trade restrictions and economic pressure in American foreign policy, from broad-based to targeted sanctions. U.S. efforts to achieve strategic aims through sanctions and financial pressure against North Korea, Iran, Libya, and Syria. Changes and challenges in the use of these tools in foreign policy.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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CSYC 321, SO, Internet Law and Technology. Frederick Polner, attorney. Lecturer in Yale College.

Legal and public-policy issues concerning the Internet and telecommunications technology. Basic concepts of Internet law and technology; public-policy arguments over net neutrality; the technology and evolution of mobile devices; displacement of traditional media companies by Internet innovators.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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CSYC 323, HU, Mastering the Art of Watercolor. Adam Van Doren, artist. Lecturer in Yale College.

Introduction to the fundamentals of watercolor painting. Rendering color, form, perspective, composition, shade, and shadow. Analysis of works by artists such as J. M. W. Turner, John Singer Sargent, Maurice Prendergast, and Edward Hopper. Includes weekly painting assignments. Open both to seasoned artists and to beginners.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).
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CSYC 324, Great Big Ideas. Adam Glick, President of the Jack Parker Corporation and of the Floating University. Lecturer in Yale College.

An introduction to the world’s most important ideas in a wide variety of disciplines, including psychology, economics, art, biomedical research, linguistics, physics, politics, and demography. Ways in which innovative ideas have changed each field; the effects of those ideas on modern society. Preference to freshmen and sophomores.

For course time and location, see Online Course Information (OCI).

Application to this seminar is not done through Preference Selection. Interested students should attend the first session of the seminar in the Timothy Dwight College dining hall, at which application procedures will be discussed.

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